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20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
how often informants are given permission to break the law. the strategy is under scrutiny after the fast and furious program. >> florida today reports on the launch of spacex falcon 9 the unmanned cargo ship rocketed into orbit sunday from cape canaveral. it is the first private spacecraft to resupply the international space station. >>> and much of the country is waking up to much colder temperatures this morning. it is a bit chilly this morning. isn't it? >> when you get up at this national weather report sponsored by bp. >> crooks are stealing more smart phones than ever but it's the phone companies and what they won't do about it that's frustrating police. we'll talk about john miller. >> in 1972 president richard nixon makes it clear he doesn't want to do any more debates. we'll hear from these just revealed white house tapes and we'll see how one mistake in a debate can linger for a lifetime on cbs "this morning". online outfit piccolo headphones buy now broadway show megapixels place to sleep little roadster war and peace deep sea diving ninja app hipster glasses 5% cash
. i went to law school and wanted to work in service. i served in the white house under president carter. i went back and practiced law. i wasn't that great of a lawyer and not a great demand of service. i decided to do something different. i start ad company and it took off. so i did get fortunate to make more money than i probably can spend and therefore i'm committed to giving away the bulk of it. >> when you started your company you were 38 years old. you were telling me in the green room that believes kids today, young people today should try many things before the age of 30 because before 30 you really don't know. very few mark zuckerberg. >> very few people know what they want to do in their 20s. people should find what they enjoy not what their parents want to do and you have to experiment. you should try many different things. i did many different things. i was in government, i practiced law. not until your mid-30s do you know what you want to do. >> gayle, he's like your son and like me, a duke graduate and has done a lot of wonderful things. >> he's on the cover of "for
about what he calls his ordeal. yet state law makes it highly unlikely that he would ever profit from it. charlie, norah? >>> president obama's top counterterrorism advisers reportedly meeting with libyan officials in tripoli. they will discuss last month's attack in benghazi. sheryl atkinson has more of her interview with a key witness that will testify in a congressional hearing tomorrow morning. >> reporter: lieutenant colonel andy woodheaded an elite security team until it was pulled out one month before the benghazi attack, an attack that claimed the life of christopher stevens and three others. how well did you know ambassador stevens? >> eventually wevery well. we lived and worked on a residence compound, ate breakfast, lunch, and sometimes dinner with him when he wasn't at diplomatic functions. >> reporter: wood says ambassador stevens was eager to connect with libyans 600 miles away in benghazi, one of the first cities to declare itself free from gadhafi's rule, but it was still a dangerous place. >> i do know there was an al qaeda demonstration in benghazi in june. they had a p
military so they can enforce the law. >> nick christoph in "the new york times" has chronicled the gender-based crime against women. congo, as you just said, is the epicenter of that. >> that's absolutely true. nick's done a good job. i was one of the producers on his movie "reporter." he's the reason i first got involved in the congo because i started reading about his travels and the atrocities that he's seen and some of the warlords that he's met. i went back, interviewed some of the same people and traveled around to what i thought was the conflict matrix. >> what happens when ben affleck hits the ground? >> it gets a lot more attention. it gets networks to go and spend time talking about the drc. it gets these guys engaged, and it gets people to pay attention. he talks about -- or we talk about in the piece really using that celebrity as a currency to get people to take note. >> i'm now thinking about congo and chocolate. i never put those together. >> let me tell you, you saw the coco that was being manufactured. you saw how it was brought up to these international standards. we hoo
through a state law, the 10% plan that guarantees admission to students no matter their race from the top 10% of their class. but ut admits other students by what it call holistic review, using factors that include test scores, leadership potential and race and it's this policy that's being challenged. >> what are the stakes here? >> the stakes are tremendous. >> reporter: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions. warning the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer, not just black and latino students. all students benefit from learning together inside the classroom and out. >> reporter: they've expressed the concern over the use of racial preferences, meaning affirmative action is very much on the line here today. the last time the court reviewed this, just as sandra day o'connor speculated, that race preferences might not be needed after 25 yea
new laws because the fda said yesterday, one of the attorneys, spokesperson said we simply don't have the regulations we need now in order to address this situation. >> dr. jon lapook has been following this closely. thank you, doctor. we appreciate it. >>> this morning also the boy scouts of america organization is accused of a century-long cover-up hiding evidence of sexual abuse by scout leaders. as john blackstone reports, the secrecy is ending with a wave of evidence now posted online for everyone to see. >> reporter: tom stewart became a cub scout in 1970 and almost immediately became a victim of his scout master. >> i was in scouting with my brother, matt. and we were sexually abused for the better part of ten years from age 8 to 18. >> reporter: he says he is just one of many boy scouts who have been molested by those they trusted. >> it's not easy for me to get up here and talk about this. but, you know i do want to speak for all the victims that can't speak for themselves. >> reporter: there have been hundreds, if not thousands of other v
is the cdc. >> what can the health community do to deal with this? >> they are saying they need new laws because the fda said yesterday, one of the attorneys, spokesperson said we simply don't have the regulations that we need now in order to address this situation. thank, you doctor. >>> this morning, the boy scouts of america organization is accused of a century long cover-up, hiding evidence of sexual abuse by scout leaders. the secrecy is ending with a wave of evidence that's posted online for everyone to see. >> reporter: tom stewart became a cub scout in 1970 and almost immediately became a victim of his scout master. >> i was in scouting with my brother matt and we were sexually abused for better part of ten years from age 8 to 18. >> reporter: he says he's just one of many boy scouts who have been molested by those he trusted. >> it's not easy for me to get up here and talk about this. but i do want to speak for all the victims that can't speak for themselves. >> reporter: there have been hundreds if not thousands of other victims documented by the boy scouts in what's been calle
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)